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February 26, 2013

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Phil

From demanding rights for Tibetans to demanding the right to be Tibetans - very much a rearguard action, and a fairly unpolitical one at that. (Rule of thumb: choice of restaurant is very rarely a radical act. OK, lunch counters in Mississippi, but that's not quite the same kind of choice.)

dsquared

Heavy metal, nationalist politics and traditionalism seem to go together like pie, chips and gravy.

ajay

Rule of thumb: choice of restaurant is very rarely a radical act.

Clothing choice, on the other hand, definitely is.

ajay

Heavy metal, nationalist politics and traditionalism seem to go together like pie, chips and gravy.

True dat. Look at Iron Maiden. (Recently saw a video of them performing live in Argentina. You don't see ninety thousand Argentinians cheering a British bloke in a British army uniform waving an enormous Union Flag that often.)

Chris Williams

Laibach might be a closer, if not better, fit.

dsquared

Sepultura are the most interesting example in my mind because they're clearly in the traditional/nationalist heavy metal current, but in the Brazilian context that doesn't put them politically on the right - they're quite unusual in Brazilian pop culture in being explicit about the fact that their country isn't all bikinis and football.

chris y

This actually reads more like a way of disengaging with direct confrontation than anything else: a retreat into culture.

They probably said the same thing about Pádraig Pearse at one stage. If the balance of forces demands retreat, using the time to consolidate your cultural milieu isn't a bad idea, because when you can go forward again you have more water to swim in.

Phil

True - and Plaid Cymru was a club of ageing language geeks at one time.

The dynamics of 'keeping the flame alive' interest me - in particular, whether it actually matters. The post hoc ergo propter hoc temptation is huge. If you take Plaid, I think the party's current status (and the normalisation of the language more widely) dates back to the 1970s period of cottage-burning and road sign vandalism, and more specifically to the dawning realisation among all concerned that (a) there were quite a lot of people doing it and (b) there were an awful lot of people looking the other way. Something, in other words, was going on here. But would none of it have happened without the people who took the cultural turn years & decades earlier? No Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, no S4C? I'm not sure.

I'm very much in favour of keeping flames alive as a general thing, I'm just not convinced that the world at large gives a monkey's.

Barry Freed

Surely whether it matters and whether the world at large gives a monkey's are two different things? (At least with regard to 'keeping the flame alive,' and retreating into culture whereas with serial self-immolation campaigns one very much depends on the other).

Cian

Rule of thumb: choice of restaurant is very rarely a radical act.

You should come to the US south some time. There's quite a few local restaurants who are explicit about their confederate, or anti-immigrant, politics. Of course one of the most anti-immigrant places serves Mexican food, so there's that.

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