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December 31, 2013

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johnf

That is a great piece of description.

Milligan had an enormous influence - on everyone from the Beatles to Monty Python. His war memoirs started to open a whole new perspective on the war (and were funny and moving). He used his imagination which allowed us to use ours.

Now he seems greatly neglected. He seems all the things its wrong to be.

But he did inaugurate a time (very brief) when voices from other than the educated upper middle classes were allowed to speak. And by and large they spoke wonderfully and idiosyncratically and often in a Blakeian way.

Richard J

His war memoirs are some of the funniest things I've ever read; as well as one of the more moving when abruptly, at the end of one of them, he succumbs to shell shock. There's few memoirs that capture the abrupt fragemntation of a mental collapse so well.

(It's just a bit of a shame about the reflexive racism he was more than prone to.)

ajay

I'm still wrestling with the description of Spike Milligan as "Blakeian". Both poets, both from South London, both drew strange pictures, both were somewhat psychologically uneven, I suppose. Bring me my bow of burning gold! FX: JELLY SPLOSH. You rotten swine!

ajay

But he did inaugurate a time (very brief) when voices from other than the educated upper middle classes were allowed to speak.

Light entertainment before Spike Milligan wasn't the exclusive preserve of the upper middle classes. Anything but. You think Tommy Handley went to Haileybury?

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