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December 30, 2010

Comments

Richard J

http://uk.linkedin.com/in/jontyolliffcooper

His Linkedin profile is, well, revealing. A classic Failed In Consulting, Try Politics one. FICTP, maybe. Hmm. The acronym could do with some work.

ejh

Or just try Too Rich To Fail. Not much use in the acronym stakes, but nevertheless a concept for our times.

Solomon Hughes

I wrote this Eye piece - glad you liked it. After it appeared Jonty twittered "adding this wk's @PrivateEyeNews bit on me to the skin-thickening pile.nice to be gently ribbed on s'thing other than my silly name for once ". there I was trying to rip away at the hypocrisy of the Tories and their corporate pals, but it turned out I was only gently ribbing. aargh.

BenSix

You'll have to print a piece in next fortnight's issue that just says, "No, really, Jonty sucks goat balls..."

skidmarx

What's quite noticeable about workfare schemes in my experience is that the companies involved benefit from jobshirkers leaving the scheme, whether they find work or not; thus they have an incentive not to offer genuine training, but to make the ordeal as tedious and unpleasant as possible in order to encourage an exodus.Particularly true of "employability training".

Alex

It's somehow impressive that he managed to get through 5 jobs in 2009-2010. Also, they're overselling him - his PoFacedBook profile doesn't actually claim to have worked in No.10 at all.

There's a twitter feed. Sample: "Boy in act of being hit by a car in Israel..."

Also, I'm only six connections away from this hugely influential #PublicThinker.

Alex

Killer detail: Mum and Dad were the subjects of a Channel 4 docusoap about being posh back in 2003. Actually, this is incredibly weird. The Olliff-Coopers, all of them, were the subjects of a reality TV show in which they pretended to be more posh than they actually are, in a Scottish baronial castle, set in 1905. Here's the detail.

Meanwhile, an Atlantic low or two up-wind, the kid brother.

My previous employment has focused primarily on sales. My first job was working at Curry's Digital working on the shop floor selling various electrical appliances....Over the next three years whilst I complete my undergraduate degree at Keble College, Oxford I hope to meet many more interesting people, and procure an insight into their professional life's so that I might be better placed to come out of university with a clear plan of action of how best to enter the world of finance.

I have a secret desire to combine my interest in Philosophy and Broadcasting to become a television philosopher in a peculiar cross between Allan De Botton and David Starkey.

ejh

All right, let's have a competition to guess the size of the donation his parents made to Keble.

hellblazer

Does Winchester College no longer teach its pupils what the plural of "life" is, or how to Google Alain de Botton's name so as to spell it correctly?

I hope to meet many more interesting people, and procure an insight into their professional life's so that I might be better placed to come out of university with a clear plan of action of how best to enter the world of finance.

Why is he expecting to get (sorry, "procure") an insight into the *professional* lives of people he meets at *university*? Also, the clumsy prefab string of words following "so that" really needs a machete taken to it, if only to turn it from badly written bullshit into snappier bullshit...

Myles SG

All right, let's have a competition to guess the size of the donation his parents made to Keble.

Alas, donations make no difference whatsoever to Oxford admissions. I have an extremely good friend whose uncle must have donated a seriously good chunk of money (as in placed named after him) in recent years (and in addition the family having continuousy attended Oxford for more than a century) who was refused admission, despite his family's fairly robust efforts to make sure they got the maximum traction out of the donation.

I have another friend whose father, a man who went to one of the very best American prep schools and whose forefathers have gone to Yale for something like two centuries, was refused admission back in the day (1970's probably), when stuff like this was supposed to count much more than it does now (he eventually went to Penn-Wharton, so he wasn't deliquent or anything).

ejh

Alas, donations make no difference whatsoever to Oxford admissions

That's a view based on your own experience and that's fair enough....but the contrary is a view based on mine.

ajay

Go on, ejh.

ejh

Oh, no names you'd have heard of. (Sorry.) But it's remarkable how many stupid people at my Oxford college had fathers who'd been there.

Myles SG

Oh, no names you'd have heard of. (Sorry.) But it's remarkable how many stupid people at my Oxford college had fathers who'd been there.

Selection factor. Sons of Oxford men are more likely to have attended the better public schools, and thus better prepared academically for A-levels and interviews (especially interviews).

By the way, my vague impression (from l'affaire Tracy Playle, and anyone please correct me if I am wrong) is that Oxford admission dons can be a bit prejudiced against people from less established backgrounds. Which might contribute to the selection of sons of Oxford independently of pecuniary factors. Or is this one of those pseudo-scandals that British media love to blow out of thin air?

Myles SG

(by British media, I mean Daily Mail).

ajay

Plus that's kind of a different issue - sons of oxford graduates are not necessarily sons of major donors. If you are rich and want your child to go to oxford, by far your best bet is to buy them a place at an elite school. I am sceptical that a big donation to the college would do much.
The less bright students at my college came from all sorts of backgrounds, though I will say the richer ones were less good at concealing it.

Myles SG

The less bright students at my college came from all sorts of backgrounds, though I will say the richer ones were less good at concealing it.

That's because in England there's no shame in being dull, if you are upper crust.

ejh

If you are rich and want your child to go to oxford, by far your best bet is to buy them a place at an elite school.

Mmm, but if that doesn't come off, a little side-bet doesn't hurt none.

Phil

Philip Hensher has been chewing on the Oxbridge meritocracy bone (shorter: the stars I knew at college aren't actually properly famous as such, whereas I've got a column in the Indie, so Gray's Elegy Was Right!). Longer and slightly less grumpy reaction (with bonus Welsh) here.

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